Here's the bottom line:

Learning how to manage your mind is the 

key to creating kick ass results in your life. 

 

There's a lot of people who have great ideas that go nowhere because they've talked themselves out of it.

Worse, there are those who've started something 

only to get stuck in doubt and fear.

 

But here's what I learned through coaching:

  • Taking action with an unmanaged mind vs

taking action with a managed mind will give you

 completely different results.

  • Having self care strategies in place will dramatically 

impact the success of your vision.

  • Someone to hold you accountable and  

keep you focused will exponentially increase 

your personal and business growth.

Let's work together and I'll put you in 

the position to have the following:

  • Clarity on your vision, goals and dreams 

...no more being in a fog of uncertainty

 

  • Confidence built from an empowering mindset

...no more self doubt stalling you out

  • A clear path to overcome obstacles and move forward

...no more wondering how

  • A coaching experience that will keep you on task

and help you realize your full potential.

The results will be game changing.

I'll teach you how to manage the head trash 

that gets in the way of your vision

and inspire you to take massive action

that gets what you really want.

  

MY ENTREPRENEURIAL JOURNEY...

What is a WANT-A-PRE-NEUR?

Shortly after having my last child, I suffered from the worst postpartum depression. In an effort to help me feel better my husband Bill, invited me to join him on a business trip to South America. He hoped that a change of scenery and some time away would be a good opportunity to reconnect with myself. I arranged child care for my kids, packed my bags and I was off to Argentina. I never imagined that trip would change the trajectory of my life.  

Once there, I was able to get the rest I needed. Toward the end of the trip, Bill asked me to join him on location where he was filming a commercial for a non-profit organization. Having no idea where I was going, we headed off the paved highway out of Buenos Aires and onto a dirt road that lead to a local food bank in Pilar, a province outside the city.

Upon arrival I saw the kids coming to eat at this makeshift house.  Some came barefoot, some came without coats in the middle of Argentina’s winter.  Even though it doesn’t get as cold as the Midwest where I’m from, barefoot and coatless in 40 degrees is not something I’d want to do.

 

I began connecting with the kids, taking their photos and showing them their pictures, only to find out from the interpreter that they’d never seen a photo of themselves. I remember the film crew giving them new soccer balls, with the excitement that was generated you would have thought they gave them new iPhones.

I kept thinking about my three boys back home who had everything life could ask for, well fed, warm and clean in their beds.  After leaving Pilar, I could not get the kids out of my mind.  In knew I could not return to life as normal without doing something for those children. 

 

Shortly after my return, an idea popped into my head. I sent an email to everyone I knew and told them what I'd experienced in Argentina. I stated I was going to have a charity garage sale and would accept items they'd like to donate and take the proceeds back to the kids in Pilar.

A month later, I befriended a woman in my town - Judy, who volunteered to help me.  She became my interpreter as we tried to locate the food bank operator. Through our efforts, we found out the woman running the food bank I wanted to help, was actually doing it from an extention of her home. Everyday she cooked for 100 kids in the surrounding area. For some, it was their only meal. That fueled me to want to help them even more. 

 

You know how when you’re up to something good - the universe conspires? That's what happened, people and things came into my path that helped me do what I was being called to do.  Donations flooded in.  Volunteers came out of the woodwork. The local police allowed us to block off the road to have the sale on the street. We generated $7000 in one day.

I made plans to take the money back to Argentina.  Once there, I finally met the woman who was running the food bank - Christina. I found out the gender and ages of the kids, then scoured Buenos Aires to purchase 100 pairs of shoes, underclothes and socks. I learned Christina’s meal was a vegetable soup. I paid a local butcher to have meat delivered weekly for one year. It was an intoxicating moment to witness the excitement of the kids when we distributed the shoes and underclothes to them.  

The last day of my trip, I went shopping and bought a beautiful cowhide bag (Argentina’s known for their leather goods).  I came back to the states and began using the handbag.  An interesting thing started to happen.  Every day someone would compliment me on my new handbag ask where I got it. This happened so much, that it triggered an idea . . . import the bags and donate a portion back to the kids.  But this time donate books - to help empower them.

I began importing the bags and selling them.  I went back to Argentina the following year and donated another six months worth of meat to the food bank and scoured the city for books. The 350 donated books was the start of their first library.  I met the handbag supplier and began designing the bags.

The following year, I decided to keep it local.  I found a school in Chicago that had no library.  I donated 1000 books to start the first library for Polaris Charter Academy on the west side of Chicago.

In 2011 the Hyde Bags donation went to help a single mother who left an abusive marriage

and was raising her four children on her own.

Hyde Bags was a fabulous socially conscious business that 

impacted many people very positively.    

Through coaching I learned the invaluable

power of mindset management and
 the importance of having self care rituals in place to keep

me balanced as a business owner, mother and wife.  

Now I love empowering women with these

tools and strategies to do the same. 

© Patricia Cimino 2018

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